(Source: bungarubble, via juliasegal)

candidinatlanta:

"As the protesters marched through the streets, it began to storm. Every time the thunder crashed, the protesters would cheer louder and louder. It seemed as if mother nature herself were cheering them on.."

(via zombivish)

lizardvvizard:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Chaos in Ferguson. Sunday night, part 4

[part 1] [part 2] [part 3

Reminder that:

- no, this isn’t over;
- no, these aren’t from earlier in the week;
- no, everything isn’t alright now;
- no, the police haven’t stopped brutalizing peaceful protesters;
- no, police haven’t intervened to stop the looting;
- no, police haven’t responded to emergency 911 calls for people injured by rubber bullets or children hit by cars;
- no, michael brown’s shooter still has not faced any consequences for murdering an unarmed teenager 9 days ago

(via zombivish)

humansofnewyork:

"Tell me about the day you decided to leave Syria.""Our house was next to a checkpoint for the government, so we thought it was safe. There were snipers around, but we thought they knew us. They’d seen us everyday. But one day the electricity got very weak. The television was still working, but the refrigerator and washing machine cut off, so my brother went into the yard to check it. And then we heard a scream. It wasn’t exactly a scream, more like an ‘Ahhhh!’ And I ran outside. And there he was.""What is your fondest memory of your brother?""When we built a second story for our house, my brother and I spent the whole day working together. We were playing tricks on people. We were putting salt in their tea. We were hiding instead of working. We were laughing the entire day.""What were you thinking when you found him in the yard?"“‘How can I save him?’ How can I save him?’ How can I save him? How can I save him? How can I save him?’”"What did your mother say?""She didn’t say a thing. The whole family was screaming. But she didn’t make a sound." (Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan)

humansofnewyork:

"Tell me about the day you decided to leave Syria."
"Our house was next to a checkpoint for the government, so we thought it was safe. There were snipers around, but we thought they knew us. They’d seen us everyday. But one day the electricity got very weak. The television was still working, but the refrigerator and washing machine cut off, so my brother went into the yard to check it. And then we heard a scream. It wasn’t exactly a scream, more like an ‘Ahhhh!’ And I ran outside. And there he was."
"What is your fondest memory of your brother?"
"When we built a second story for our house, my brother and I spent the whole day working together. We were playing tricks on people. We were putting salt in their tea. We were hiding instead of working. We were laughing the entire day."
"What were you thinking when you found him in the yard?"
“‘How can I save him?’ How can I save him?’ How can I save him? How can I save him? How can I save him?’”
"What did your mother say?"
"She didn’t say a thing. The whole family was screaming. But she didn’t make a sound." 
(Zaatari Refugee Camp, Jordan)

zombivish:

Hitch knew the score

(Source: myexternalmemory)

Oh yes. All of this.

Oh yes. All of this.

(Source: kapowndtown, via be0k)

"Sometimes people thousand of miles away can make you feel better than someone right beside you"

— (via riding-the-wavez)

(via be0k)

coldufemur:

Sawa Takai FW2013

Sawa Takai explores deliberate layering through addition and subtraction. Engineered melton wool double-paneling functions as protective sheaths symbolizing strength and concealment. These heavy layers are contrasted by removed panels and split seams in soft flannel revealing interior linings and representing vulnerability and exposure. Together these themes play on Takai’s reflections on metropolitan women who must preserve their inner tenderness while projecting strength to the world to survive.

All of this. Taking my breath away.

(Source: sawatakai.com, via zombivish)

coolator:

jurassic park from the raptors’ perspective 

(via zombivish)